This week’s person of power is Lo Harris, a digital artist who just recently drew Michelle Obama and Amanda Gorman at the inauguration of President Joe Biden. Sharing a last name with the Vice President excites her, but there are other reasons Lo is looking forward to Kamala Harris entering the White House.

“I'm so happy that we've gotten to this point, but I do approach it with a sense of trepidation because this isn't the end all be all,” she says. “The work isn't done. We still need to create a future where more folks can come forward and speak their mind and represent their country.”

Lo specializes in illustration and motion design. The Brooklyn-based artist from Alabama creates vibrant pieces that incorporate mostly Black women. The characters in her illustrations have deep skin tones and are set in colorful backgrounds. The women smirk, big-lipped, and are dressed in fun clothing.

Her work is distinctively bright and filled with Black joy.

“I try to create work that is very relational. I want people to be able to find specificities in it and have a callback to themselves,” she says. “So that might mean me including culturally specific hairstyles in my work, or different body shapes in my work.”

For example, Lo has a gap between her front teeth, and her illustrations often include that feature. It’s a feature that is distinctly Black — a signifier of sorts.

Lo previously worked in journalism — an industry where avoiding bias and statements that are too opinionated is part of the job. However, within her art endeavors, she feels more free to speak her mind and share her thoughts with others. 2020 gave her the opportunity to wade into waters where she could talk more about social issues, like BLM.

“2020 really showed me that I'm able to create work that not only expresses the full extent of what I'm feeling emotionally during all of these traumatic events, but it’s also content that other people can use to express their own emotions and share how they feel,” she says.

“As a Black woman, I think that it is a tremendous privilege to have this gift, and to be able to share it with other people.”

In early 2020, Lo joined Instagram, as an experiment and exploration of her own style and art. Social media wasn’t just a place for her to show off her skills — on a personal level, it was her trial-and-error-style scrapbook, a place to play around. She had no idea she would reach so many people with her work — she currently has nearly 25,000 followers on the platform.

“When I created it, I really wanted to push myself to the next limit to find my artistic style and explore different things. That's something that as an artist I never want to let go of either, even as people get more familiar with my work,” she says. Lo is committed to challenging herself and developing her craft, a dedication that has paid off and will likely continue.

While it has been an emotional year for Lo, she feels that her work has been successful because it has contributed to a larger conversation.

“I would not take my contributions to the conversation of this year back in any way. Because it did really show me the value and the weight of my voice as a Black woman in media,” she says. “It has shown me that there are other people within my community who have very powerful things to say as well.”

The killing of George Floyd had a particular impact on her and ultimately motivated her to leave the news industry.

“I worked in graphics. And it required me to write down and animate the last words of George Floyd. So I had to kind of listen to this man die over and over and over and still maintain a sense of professionalism. And that really broke me,” she says.

Her artwork is a response to the Black trauma that we usually see in media. Instead of leaning into this narrative, Lo goes in the opposite direction. Highlighting the joys of being Black, even in a time of so much struggle.

“I noticed that in art communities there's a sizable number of non-Black artists who are creating and engaging with that Black trauma sometimes and profiting from that as well. I think that it's my responsibility to provide an alternative narrative. Black joy is something that I always try to implement in my work, not in ignorance of what's happening, but in spite of what's happening in a very intentional way,” she says.

Now that she’s left the corporate world, she’s diving headfirst into her artwork. She’s currently working on a children’s book that is set to release in 2022.

Her artwork doesn’t just touch the people who see it while scrolling on their feeds, or fans who order her prints to adorn their walls. Lo’s work helps herself to heal, too.

“At the core of every single one of my illustrations is a seed of hope. A lot of the content I create is always rooted in confidence, joy, self-reflection, self-advocacy. I'm trying to become the person that I want to be… who is kind, who is forgiving, who shows gratitude through my work… by making that the message within my work,” she says.

“I’m almost kind of trying to use my work as an aspirational tool for myself, that I'm sharing with the public so that I can follow my quest of becoming a more happy, more secure, and more grateful person.”

Every time you buy an Inkbox tattoo, you’re directly supporting the artist who created it. Lo’s collection is out now, so you can help support her work all while wearing your self-love and gratitude on your sleeve.

Author: Melinda Faukuade
Photo: Zabel Castillo
Video: Ben Hype
Creative Director: Becky Brown
Creative Producer: Rasheem Jamar
Senior Designer: Kelsey Cadenas
Casting Director: Jacqueline Rosa

This week’s person of power is Lo Harris, a digital artist who just recently drew Michelle Obama and Amanda Gorman at the inauguration of President Joe Biden. Sharing a last name with the Vice President excites her, but there are other reasons Lo is looking forward to Kamala Harris entering the White House.

“I'm so happy that we've gotten to this point, but I do approach it with a sense of trepidation because this isn't the end all be all,” she says. “The work isn't done. We still need to create a future where more folks can come forward and speak their mind and represent their country.”

Lo specializes in illustration and motion design. The Brooklyn-based artist from Alabama creates vibrant pieces that incorporate mostly Black women. The characters in her illustrations have deep skin tones and are set in colorful backgrounds. The women smirk, big-lipped, and are dressed in fun clothing.

Her work is distinctively bright and filled with Black joy.

“I try to create work that is very relational. I want people to be able to find specificities in it and have a callback to themselves,” she says. “So that might mean me including culturally specific hairstyles in my work, or different body shapes in my work.”

For example, Lo has a gap between her front teeth, and her illustrations often include that feature. It’s a feature that is distinctly Black — a signifier of sorts.

Lo previously worked in journalism — an industry where avoiding bias and statements that are too opinionated is part of the job. However, within her art endeavors, she feels more free to speak her mind and share her thoughts with others. 2020 gave her the opportunity to wade into waters where she could talk more about social issues, like BLM.

“2020 really showed me that I'm able to create work that not only expresses the full extent of what I'm feeling emotionally during all of these traumatic events, but it’s also content that other people can use to express their own emotions and share how they feel,” she says.

“As a Black woman, I think that it is a tremendous privilege to have this gift, and to be able to share it with other people.”

In early 2020, Lo joined Instagram, as an experiment and exploration of her own style and art. Social media wasn’t just a place for her to show off her skills — on a personal level, it was her trial-and-error-style scrapbook, a place to play around. She had no idea she would reach so many people with her work — she currently has nearly 25,000 followers on the platform.

“When I created it, I really wanted to push myself to the next limit to find my artistic style and explore different things. That's something that as an artist I never want to let go of either, even as people get more familiar with my work,” she says. Lo is committed to challenging herself and developing her craft, a dedication that has paid off and will likely continue.

While it has been an emotional year for Lo, she feels that her work has been successful because it has contributed to a larger conversation.

“I would not take my contributions to the conversation of this year back in any way. Because it did really show me the value and the weight of my voice as a Black woman in media,” she says. “It has shown me that there are other people within my community who have very powerful things to say as well.”

The killing of George Floyd had a particular impact on her and ultimately motivated her to leave the news industry.



“I worked in graphics. And it required me to write down and animate the last words of George Floyd. So I had to kind of listen to this man die over and over and over and still maintain a sense of professionalism. And that really broke me,” she says.

Her artwork is a response to the Black trauma that we usually see in media. Instead of leaning into this narrative, Lo goes in the opposite direction. Highlighting the joys of being Black, even in a time of so much struggle.

“I noticed that in art communities there's a sizable number of non-Black artists who are creating and engaging with that Black trauma sometimes and profiting from that as well. I think that it's my responsibility to provide an alternative narrative. Black joy is something that I always try to implement in my work, not in ignorance of what's happening, but in spite of what's happening in a very intentional way,” she says.

Now that she’s left the corporate world, she’s diving headfirst into her artwork. She’s currently working on a children’s book that is set to release in 2022.

Her artwork doesn’t just touch the people who see it while scrolling on their feeds, or fans who order her prints to adorn their walls. Lo’s work helps herself to heal, too.

“At the core of every single one of my illustrations is a seed of hope. A lot of the content I create is always rooted in confidence, joy, self-reflection, self-advocacy. I'm trying to become the person that I want to be… who is kind, who is forgiving, who shows gratitude through my work… by making that the message within my work,” she says.

“I’m almost kind of trying to use my work as an aspirational tool for myself, that I'm sharing with the public so that I can follow my quest of becoming a more happy, more secure, and more grateful person.”

Every time you buy an Inkbox tattoo, you’re directly supporting the artist who created it. Lo’s collection is out now, so you can help support her work all while wearing your self-love and gratitude on your sleeve.

Author: Melinda Faukuade
Photo: Zabel Castillo
Video: Ben Hype
Creative Director: Becky Brown
Creative Producer: Rasheem Jamar
Senior Designer: Kelsey Cadenas
Casting Director: Jacqueline Rosa